Inadequate Care

The President of LMRR alleges it is the volunteer’s responsibility to keep their facility clean and that this issue was a One day occurrence, are all these issues in two different inspections – a One day occurrence?  Why are animals suffering without proper Vet care in a facility that claims to rescue and rehabilitate rabbits?  

Is the President of LMRR a properly trained assistant, who is acting under the supervision of a licensed and practicing veterinarian?
In order to practice veterinary medicine in New Jersey, a license is mandatory.  Any person shall be regarded as practicing veterinary medicine who, either directly or indirectly, diagnoses, prognoses, treats, administers, prescribes, operates on, manipulates, or applies any apparatus or appliance for any disease, pain, deformity, defect, injury, wound or physical condition of any animal…  http://veterinarians.uslegal.com/state-laws-on-regulation-and-licensing-of-veterinarians/new-jersey/

It is alleged by previous volunteers that the President of LMRR tried to set the leg of this rabbit. 

Continuation sheet for inspection conducted on July 24,

2012 by Linda Frese and Renee Cirillo, New Jersey Department of Health, and James Perry, Camden County Department of Health

1.9(d)
A rabbit named Dante was brought into the facility on 4/18/12 with a severe leg injury. The leg was splinted by the shelter president on the day of arrival, but records show that this animal was not seen by a veterinarian until 5/11/12.
There was no evidence produced at the time of this inspection that showed the rabbit was provided with at least prompt, basic veterinary care as required. This rabbit was not at the facility on the date of this inspection.

1.6(a)
Some animal crates and cages are stacked, but are not designed for this purpose. Debris and waste from upper cages falls into the cages below.

1.6(a)4.
Animals are unable to remain clean and dry due to the excessive amount of excreta in their primary enclosures.

1.6(d)
Animals are rotated to a playpen during the cleaning process. At the time of this inspection, the playpen contained an accumulation of excrement and debris from other animals. This playpen was not cleaned and disinfected between inhabitants. All enclosures, carriers, and holding pens or runs must be cleaned and disinfected before another animal is placed in them.

1.7(e)
Feeding pans are not cleaned and disinfected on a daily basis as required.

1.7(h)
Water bottles are not cleaned on a daily basis. The bottles are topped up with water when they become less than half full. Receptacles for water must be cleaned daily.

1.8(a)
Excreta is not removed from primary enclosures often enough to prevent contamination of the animals contained therein, and to control odors. At the time of inspection, enclosures contained an excessive amount of excreta and odors were uncontrolled due to the amount of urine and feces in each primary enclosure, including urine and feces saturated wood pellets used as litter in litter receptacles.

Animals are not removed from enclosures during the cleaning process. At the time of inspection, cleaning fluids were poured into the enclosures containing rabbits, for the purpose of allowing the cleaning fluid to soak to remove caked on waste materials. Cleaning staff sprayed cleaning solutions and vacuumed enclosures while the animals remained in the
enclosures.

1.8(b)
Primary enclosures are not cleaned often enough to prevent an accumulation of debris and excreta. At the time of this inspection, there was an excessive amount of excreta and debris on cage floors and resting benches.

1.8(c)
Cages and hard surfaced pens are not cleaned and disinfected on a daily basis. Floors are swept and occasionally wet mopped but are not disinfected on a daily basis. All floors, animal enclosures and other pens or holding areas must be cleaned and disinfected on a daily basis. Urine encrusted stains in primary enclosures and litter receptacles must be thoroughly scrubbed to remove the stains before the final disinfection process.

1.9(g)
The isolation room is not to be used for any purpose other than the segregation of animals with signs of communicable
disease. All items that are being stored in the isolation room must be removed, cleaned and disinfected, or disposed of if the item can not be disinfected, and appropriately stored elsewhere to prevent contamination.

Animals that were not exhibiting or being treated for signs of communicable disease were housed in the isolation room at the time of this inspection. This included wild rabbits that had been raised by a surrogate mother and were isolated due to stress; a rabbit named Allyson that was isolated due to pregnancy; Bertucci, isolated for a bite wound; Lennox, isolated for bad teeth; and a rabbit brought to the facility for boarding with no name or cage card. There were no daily treatment logs or other records showing that animals housed in the isolation room were being treated for a communicable disease.

If animals need to be segregated for reasons other than communicable disease, they must be housed in a different area of the shelter that meets the needs of the animals, such as a quite area to provide relief from stress. This would also include animals that are brought into the shelter and are being observed for a period of time before being placed with the general population, but are not currently exhibiting signs of communicable disease.

1.10(a)
1. Stray animals are accepted into the facility although the facility is not licensed as a “pound” and the shelter is not contracted with or authorized by any New Jersey municipality to accept and impound stray animals. Any animal brought to the facility that is known to be or suspected to be a stray animal must not be accepted into the facility, but must be turned over
to the contracting animal impoundment facility for the municipality where the animal was found.

Wild rabbits were found at the facility at the time of this inspection. Wild animals must be turned over to a wildlife rehabilitator currently licensed in New Jersey by the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife.

People bringing animals to the facility are ordered to sign an owner surrender form even when the person bringing the animal into the facility states that they are not the owner of the animal and the animal was found as a stray.
One example is a rabbit named Princess, 8 weeks old, which arrived at the facility on 6/19/12, ID#PR061912. This practice of falsifying documents must cease immediately and all stray animals must be handled as stated above.

1.13(a)
Some animals housed at the facility did not have proper records at the time of this inspection. A cage card on a cage that was empty, but had not been cleaned, showed that Aerie, ID number 5/9/12, was adopted on 5/19/12. This animal was said to be owned by the facility president, but when questioned, the name of the animal as stated on the cage card was unknown and no
records were found for this animal. Inspectors were told that several animals marked as adopted on the cage card were actually owned by the facility president.
Animals that are said to have been born at the facility are recorded as stray on the animal’s records.

1.4(f)
All interior building surfaces must be impervious to moisture and readily cleaned. The wood behind the metal cages in the back of the small animal room is not impervious and is stained with urine.

The floors in the isolation room are stained and are not impervious to moisture. The floor in the office area and the main access area between the main rabbit room and the small animal room contains carpeting. The carpet behind and around the desk had numerous rabbit droppings on it and large water type stains. This room smelled of a sour, possibly vomit type odor. Animals shall not be permitted on surfaces that are not impervious and easily cleaned and disinfected.  Carpeting used in animal enclosures must be removed and replaced with new carpeting when wet or contaminated with excreta, or when a different animal is placed in the enclosure. Carpeting is not impervious to moisture and cannot be readily cleaned and disinfected.

 

Continuation sheet for inspection conducted on August 16, 2012 by Linda Frese  and Renee Cirillo, New Jersey Department of Health, and James Perry, Camden  County Department of Health.

1.4 (f) The floors in the isolation room are stained and are not impervious to moisture. All interior building surfaces shall be constructed and maintained so that they are impervious to moisture and may be
readily cleaned.

1.6 (a)4. Some rabbits are unable to remain clean and dry due to the amount of excreta in their primary enclosures. The rabbit
enclosures in the main rabbit room were not cleaned often enough to prevent the rabbits from becoming contaminated with their own urine and feces, or the urine and feces of the other rabbits housed in the same enclosure.
1.6 (d) Wire boxes were being constructed to hold rabbits during the cleaning process. These holding boxes must be constructed in such a manor as to prevent injury to or escape of the rabbits placed in them.

1.7 (e) Feeding pans are not cleaned and disinfected on a daily basis as required. Rabbit food was placed in the food bowls that had been left in the enclosure since the previous feeding.
1.7 (h) Upon arrival, inspectors noted that some water bottles were completely empty. Water must be accessible to animal at all times, unless contraindicated by the supervising veterinarian. Water bottles are not cleaned on a daily basis. Some of the water bottles contained a green film. Receptacles for water must be cleaned daily.

1.8 (a) Excreta is not removed from primary enclosures often enough to prevent contamination of the animals contained therein, and to control odors. At the time of inspection, there was a strong urine odor in the main rabbit room.
1.8 (b) Primary enclosures are not cleaned often enough to prevent an accumulation of debris and excreta. At the time of this inspection, there was an excessive amount of excreta and debris on cage floors and resting benches in enclosures of rabbits that are not litter trained.

1.8 (c) Cages and hard surfaced pens are not cleaned and disinfected on a daily basis. During this inspection, no cages were cleaned during the hours that inspectors were on the premises. There were no disinfectants currently being used in animal enclosures.
The only disinfectant on the premises was a small bottle of bleach, but inspectors were told that disinfectants will not be used in animal enclosures. Floors are not disinfected on a daily basis. All floors, animal enclosures and other pens or holding areas must be cleaned and disinfected on a daily basis. Urine encrusted stains in primary enclosures and litter receptacles must be thoroughly scrubbed to remove the stains before the final disinfection process.
Inspectors were told that steam cleaners will be purchased to clean and disinfect primary enclosures. There are many steam cleaners available on the market, but not all steam cleaners produce enough heat to generate steam that is sufficient to
destroy microorganisms. It is strongly recommended that the steam cleaner purchased is certified by the Federal EPA for
disinfection purposes.

1.9 (a) Records must be made available regarding the treatment of animals at the facility, such as daily medical logs indicating the type of treatment provided and the duration of treatment. There were several animals in the isolation room at the time of this inspection, but only one animal, a guinea pig named Bippy, had a medical chart indicating the daily medication this animal was to receive. There were several missed days of medication for this guinea pig according to the medical chart on the animal’s cage. Evidence of veterinary examinations and site visits with documented findings must also be made available to inspectors.
These records are required to document compliance with the provisions of this act. A medical folder was being developed at
the time of this inspection for use in the isolation room that will show the treatment each animal is receiving and the reason for the animal’s isolation.

1.9 (g)
The isolation room is not to be used for any purpose other than the segregation of animals with signs of communicable disease. All items that are being stored in the isolation room must be removed, cleaned and disinfected, or disposed of if the item can not be disinfected, and appropriately stored elsewhere to prevent contamination.
Animals that were not exhibiting or being treated for signs of communicable disease were housed in the isolation room at the
time of this inspection. There were no daily treatment logs or other records showing that animals housed in the isolation room
were being treated for a communicable disease.
1.13 (a) Some animals housed at the facility did not have proper records at the time of this inspection. There were several cages that did not have cage cards or other identifying information for the animals contained in the enclosures.


All animals housed at the shelter must have proper records indicating the date the animal arrived, description of the animal,
breed, age, and sex; name of the owner or person from whom the animal was acquired, and the final disposition of the animal
when the animal dies or otherwise leaves the facility.